Frequently Asked Questions


What should I do if pulled over?

Be polite and do not argue with the officer. Provide your name, drivers’ license, insurance, and registration. DO NOT make any statements that could hurt you (i.e. “I was only keeping up with traffic.”). Do not volunteer information or make excuses. If you have a passenger and believe you did not commit the infraction, have that person write down what he/she remembers. Do not make any sudden movements, and keep your hands visible at all times.

What choices do I have when I receive a ticket?

You realistically have three options: Admitting you committed the infraction, Mitigating the fine (asking for lowered amount), or Contesting the ticket. A Fourth option, doing nothing, is not viable as the consequences can be awful.

How long do I have to respond to a ticket?

The short answer is that your response must be postmarked within fifteen days of the date the citation was issued. This information should be on the front or back of the ticket you have received. The ticket should identify which court your response needs to be mailed.

What if I do not respond within fifteen days?

Usually, the court will enter a finding of “committed” and set a fine amount. Then, the court will notify the Department of Licensing that you failed to respond, and the DOL may end up suspending your license.

What choices do I have when I receive a ticket?

You realistically have three options: Admitting you committed the infraction, Mitigating the fine (asking for lowered amount), or Contesting the ticket. A Fourth option, doing nothing, is not viable as the consequences can be awful.

Should I simply pay my ticket?

While each case is different, the best answer is “no,” as you are thereby admitting the offense, which can result in higher insurance rates, a bad driving record, and possible suspension of your license.

What if I get a lot of tickets?

First, you may find it impossible to get insurance. But if you get enough tickets in a short period of time, your license will be suspended, potentially for up to seven years.

What is mitigating a ticket?

Mitigating a ticket is essentially the same as admitting the offense and paying the fine, but you ask the court to reduce the fine amount. You still wind up with a speeding ticket on your driving record.

I committed the infraction. Why hire a lawyer?

A lawyer can help you in several ways, including beating the ticket, having the severity of the infraction reduced, entering a deferral, or having the charge dropped so that it won’t effect your insurance. Even if you committed the infraction, YOU CAN STILL WIN.

Why is my fine so much? Where does the money go?

On a standard $124 ticket, $44.43 goes to the city or county that issued the ticket for court costs. 79 cents goes to crime victim fund. $44.78 goes to traffic safety programs (like Click It or Ticket It). $17 goes to the judicial information system (JIS). $5 goes to hospitals that treat people without insurance. $10 goes to investigating auto theft. Finally, $2 goes to raise awareness for brain trauma victims.

Should I do a deferral on my ticket?

It depends. Generally, a deferral is a last resort, if you cannot either beat the ticket or otherwise get a positive result. A deferral typically requires payment of fees ($125 on average) and a petition to the court. Additionally, you many not qualify for a deferral, and you can only do one every seven years. If you get another traffic infraction in the deferral period, usually a year, your deferral will be revoked and a finding of “committed” will be entered.

Isn’t it near impossible to beat a speeding ticket?

NO! Have faith; there are a lot of possibilities and ways for beating a ticket or getting an otherwise positive outcome. Each ticket is different, but it is worth contesting. Call Ashbach Law Offices, LLC today for a free consultation. Based on infraction rules, there is not a minute to spare. 24 hours a day, 7 days a week - (360) 659-4950.